Teaching

Graduate Teaching Associate

English Textual Studies 113: Survey of British Literature, beginnings to 1789
Syllabus coming soon

Graduate Instructor

Writing 105: Practices of Academic Writing
Re-imagining the Normal (freshman composition)
View syllabus

Writing 205: Critical Research and Inquiry
Gender in Religion (sophomore composition)
View syllabus


Graduate Teaching Assistant

English Textual Studies 120: Introduction to Shakespeare
Writing-intensive introductory course on Shakespeare’s texts, with special focuses on the histrionics of power, religious conflict, and women and gender in the Early Modern period. Texts included Richard III, As You Like It, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and The Tempest.

English Textual Studies 119: Topics in U.S. Literary History
Postwar U.S. Fiction
Writing-intensive course on American fiction and creative non-fiction, 1940–1995, with special focuses on the politics of race and gender; imagination, the media, and the manufacturing of the “real”; and spiritual counter-cultural approaches to the commodification of everyday life. Authors include James Baldwin, Hisaye Yamamoto, Flannery O’Connor, Jack Kerouac, Joan Didion, Kurt Vonnegut, Toni Morrison, Don DeLillo, and Chang-Rae Lee.

English Textual Studies 113: Survey of British Literature, 1789 to present
Writing-intensive introductory survey course on British literature, with special focuses on gender, class, race, and sexuality; genre and poetics; and empire and post-colonialism. Authors include Olaudah Equiano, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Blake, Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, Christina Rossetti, Bram Stoker, Wilfred Owen, Radclyffe Hall, W.B. Yeats, Padraic Pearse, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Graham Greene, Sam Selvon, Bob Marley, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, and Ian McEwan.

English Textual Studies 146: Reading Screen Cultures
Writing-intensive introductory course about film, television, and digital and new media, with special focus on the theorization of images, photography, film, and technology. Theorists include Marshall McLuhan, Stuart Hall, André Bazin, Dziga Vertov, Rudolph Arnheim, Jane Feuer, Henry Jenkins, and Janet Murray; film directors include F.W. Murnau, Akira Kurosawa, Gary Hustwit, Errol Morris, Dziga Vertov, Peter Greenaway, and Brett Gaylor.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *